Five Things You Didn't Know About Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood Five Things You Didn't Know About Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

29 Jul , 2019

It’s been a summer of really great movies, and we can add to that list Quentin Tarantino’s newest film “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”.

In my excitement for the movie, I’ve traversed the internet and found five things you didn’t know about Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood - just to amp up our collective enthusiasm.

Only Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt were allowed to read the final script

Tarantino said he worked for a whopping five years on the movie script and when he was finished, he only kept one copy. DiCaprio and Pitt had to go to Tarantino’s house to read the whole script through. They said that the script got stained over time and stayed that way.

Everyone else involved with the movie was only allowed to read the parts of the script that actually pertained to them, including Margot Robbie. I have to give Tarantino props for his secrecy on this. If I worked for that long on a script, I’d go to the ends of the earth to avoid spoilers. Though, I couldn’t deal with only one copy of the script...what if someone spills gravy on it? What then?!

The film's title is an homage to another director

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is a homage to Sergio Leone, a filmmaker that Tarantino cited as one of the most influential filmmakers of his whole career. Leone made Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) and Once Upon a Time in America (1984).

If you don’t know, Sergio Leone was an Italian filmmaker (he worked with loads of American directors, too). He made A Fistful of Dollars (1964) which was one of the first hugely successful spaghetti westerns and it spurred a revolution. 

What’s a Spaghetti Western? Sounds like I made it up? There are lots of subtle differences between a Spaghetti Western and a traditional western, but an easy distinction is that Spaghetti Westerns were mostly made by Italian filmmakers, who figured out that the western genre was pretty cheap. If you get that question right at your next trivia night, you have to share your prize with me. 

One of the Manson followers blamed Westerns - the film's lead is a Western Star

One of the Manson followers, Nancy Pitman, cited western TV shows and Hollywood as reasons for the creation of the Mansons and their followers. Quote, “We are what you have made us, we were brought up on your TV. We were brought up watching Gunsmoke [and] Have Gun Will Travel.” 

We know that the movie takes place in 1969, the year Sharon Tate (and others) were murdered by the Mansons, and the trailers hinted that this will be a part of the story. Note that this isn’t a nonfiction film, it’s just inspired by real events.

The interesting thing about the Pitman quote is that the film’s lead is a washed-up western star. I think it’s safe to assume this isn’t a coincidence. Tarantino does his homework.

Margot Robbie wore some of Sharon Tate’s jewelry for the film

Debra Tate, Sharon Tate’s living sister, was initially not super fond of this movie about her late sister. However, that changed when Tarantino let Debra read the movie script and approached her for help. You’ll see Debra Tate in the credits. 

Once involved, Debra praised Tarantino and Margot Robbie especially. Margot Robbie did her research on Sharon Tate, and Debra admired Margot’s research and even gave her some of Sharon’s real jewelry to wear for the movie. 

Margot even paid tribute to Sharon by attending the 2019 Cannes film festival with her hair braided in the same exact way that Sharon wore it to the same festival in 1968. 

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood might be Tarantino's penultimate film

Tarantino has said many many times that he’s going to call it quits from making movies once he’s made 10 films, and Once Upon a Time is his ninth. If he’s going out soon, he’s already created quite a legacy. 

However, it could actually be his last movie. Tarantino describes Once Upon a Time as his love letter to Hollywood, and he says it's his most personal film yet. He said, “I think when it comes to theatrical movies, I’ve come to the end of the road.” He’s also said that perhaps he should “quit while he’s ahead” if Once Upon a Time is “really well received”. 

This could be our last chance to go see a Tarantino film in the movie theater, so take the time to go see it. 

Check out our FULL Review on Once Upon a Time in Hollywood here: 

It’s been a summer of really great movies, and we can add to that list Quentin Tarantino’s newest film “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”.

In my excitement for the movie, I’ve traversed the internet and found five things you didn’t know about Tarantino's Once Upon a Time in Hollywood - just to amp up our collective enthusiasm.

Only Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt were allowed to read the final script

Tarantino said he worked for a whopping five years on the movie script and when he was finished, he only kept one copy. DiCaprio and Pitt had to go to Tarantino’s house to read the whole script through. They said that the script got stained over time and stayed that way.

Everyone else involved with the movie was only allowed to read the parts of the script that actually pertained to them, including Margot Robbie. I have to give Tarantino props for his secrecy on this. If I worked for that long on a script, I’d go to the ends of the earth to avoid spoilers. Though, I couldn’t deal with only one copy of the script...what if someone spills gravy on it? What then?!

The film's title is an homage to another director

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is a homage to Sergio Leone, a filmmaker that Tarantino cited as one of the most influential filmmakers of his whole career. Leone made Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) and Once Upon a Time in America (1984).

If you don’t know, Sergio Leone was an Italian filmmaker (he worked with loads of American directors, too). He made A Fistful of Dollars (1964) which was one of the first hugely successful spaghetti westerns and it spurred a revolution. 

What’s a Spaghetti Western? Sounds like I made it up? There are lots of subtle differences between a Spaghetti Western and a traditional western, but an easy distinction is that Spaghetti Westerns were mostly made by Italian filmmakers, who figured out that the western genre was pretty cheap. If you get that question right at your next trivia night, you have to share your prize with me. 

One of the Manson followers blamed Westerns - the film's lead is a Western Star

One of the Manson followers, Nancy Pitman, cited western TV shows and Hollywood as reasons for the creation of the Mansons and their followers. Quote, “We are what you have made us, we were brought up on your TV. We were brought up watching Gunsmoke [and] Have Gun Will Travel.” 

We know that the movie takes place in 1969, the year Sharon Tate (and others) were murdered by the Mansons, and the trailers hinted that this will be a part of the story. Note that this isn’t a nonfiction film, it’s just inspired by real events.

The interesting thing about the Pitman quote is that the film’s lead is a washed-up western star. I think it’s safe to assume this isn’t a coincidence. Tarantino does his homework.

Margot Robbie wore some of Sharon Tate’s jewelry for the film

Debra Tate, Sharon Tate’s living sister, was initially not super fond of this movie about her late sister. However, that changed when Tarantino let Debra read the movie script and approached her for help. You’ll see Debra Tate in the credits. 

Once involved, Debra praised Tarantino and Margot Robbie especially. Margot Robbie did her research on Sharon Tate, and Debra admired Margot’s research and even gave her some of Sharon’s real jewelry to wear for the movie. 

Margot even paid tribute to Sharon by attending the 2019 Cannes film festival with her hair braided in the same exact way that Sharon wore it to the same festival in 1968. 

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood might be Tarantino's penultimate film

Tarantino has said many many times that he’s going to call it quits from making movies once he’s made 10 films, and Once Upon a Time is his ninth. If he’s going out soon, he’s already created quite a legacy. 

However, it could actually be his last movie. Tarantino describes Once Upon a Time as his love letter to Hollywood, and he says it's his most personal film yet. He said, “I think when it comes to theatrical movies, I’ve come to the end of the road.” He’s also said that perhaps he should “quit while he’s ahead” if Once Upon a Time is “really well received”. 

This could be our last chance to go see a Tarantino film in the movie theater, so take the time to go see it. 

Check out our FULL Review on Once Upon a Time in Hollywood here: 

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